Diet and Gout

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Overview

Purines are substances that are found in some foods. Your body turns purines into uric acid. High levels of uric acid can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis that causes pain and inflammation in joints.

You may be able to help control the amount of uric acid in your body by limiting high-purine foods in your diet.

  • Plan your meals and snacks around foods that are low in purines and are safe for you to eat. These foods include:
    • Green vegetables and tomatoes.
    • Fruits.
    • Whole-grain breads, rice, and cereals.
    • Eggs, peanut butter, and nuts.
    • Low-fat milk, cheese, and other milk products.
    • Popcorn.
    • Gelatin desserts, chocolate, cocoa, and cakes and sweets, in small amounts.
  • You can eat certain foods that are medium-high in purines, but eat them only once in a while. These foods include:
    • Legumes, such as dried beans and dried peas. You can have 1 cup cooked legumes each day.
    • Asparagus, cauliflower, spinach, mushrooms, and green peas.
    • Fish and seafood (other than very high-purine seafood).
    • Oatmeal, wheat bran, and wheat germ.
  • Limit very high-purine foods, including:
    • Organ meats, such as liver, kidneys, sweetbreads, and brains.
    • Meats, including bacon, beef, pork, and lamb.
    • Game meats and any other meats in large amounts.
    • Anchovies, sardines, herring, mackerel, and scallops.
    • Gravy.
    • Beer.

Related Information

Credits

Current as of: December 20, 2021

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Anne C. Poinier MD - Internal Medicine
Martin J. Gabica MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Mary F. McNaughton Collins MD, MPH - Internal Medicine




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