Depression self-assessment

The assessment is designed for adults 18 and older.

Your results will not be shared with any Kaiser Permanente providers or saved in your electronic health record.

 

Over the last two weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems?

Your results: No symptoms of depression

Based on your answers, you have no symptoms of depression. There are many wellness resources available to help you maintain your emotional well-being, like guided meditation and mental health apps. 

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional. 
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime. 

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.

Your results: Symptoms of mild depression

Based on your answers, you have symptoms of mild depression. Mild depression is more common than most people realize. And you have many care options — like support groups, classes, and mental health apps — that can help you cope with your emotions and overcome challenges.

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional. 
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime.  
  • If you’re ever in crisis, please call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat, or text “HOME” to the 24/7 Crisis Text Line at 741741 to talk with a crisis counselor. If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Do not attempt to access emergency care through this website. 

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.

Your results: Symptoms of moderate depression

Based on your answers, you have symptoms of moderate depression. Moderate depression is common and treatable — and we can help you find support. First, you should discuss your symptoms with your doctor or a mental health professional. You can also learn about care options — like group therapy, classes, and support groups — that can help you cope with your emotions and overcome challenges.

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional. 
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime. 
  • If you’re ever in crisis, please call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255),  visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat, or text “HOME” to the 24/7 Crisis Text Line at 741741 to talk with a crisis counselor. If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Do not attempt to access emergency care through this website. 

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.

Your results: Symptoms of moderately severe depression

Based on your answers, you have symptoms of moderately severe depression. Moderately severe depression is more common than most people realize. We recommend you discuss your symptoms with your doctor or a mental health professional. Everyone’s mental health journey is different, so you can explore care options — like individual and group therapy — that can help you cope with your emotions and overcome challenges.

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional. 
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime.
  • If you’re ever in crisis, please call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat, or text “HOME” to the 24/7 Crisis Text Line at 741741 to talk with a crisis counselor. If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Do not attempt to access emergency care through this website.

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.

Your results: Symptoms of severe depression

Based on your answers, you have symptoms of severe depression. It’s important for you to seek care. If you’re in crisis, please use one of the following resources: 

  • Call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or chat online with a crisis counselor at suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat
  • Text “HOME” to 741741 to start a text chat with the Crisis Text Line 24/7. 
  • If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Do not attempt to access emergency care through this website.

Mental health conditions, like severe depression, are more common than most people realize. And we can help you find support. Discuss your symptoms with your doctor or a mental health professional right away. Everyone’s experience is different, but there are different ways you can get help for severe depression, like psychiatry and therapy.

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional.  
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime. 

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.

Your results: Symptoms of severe depression

Based on your answers, you have symptoms of severe depression. It’s important for you to seek care. If you’re in crisis, please use one of the following resources: 

  • Call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or chat online with a crisis counselor at suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat
  • Text “HOME” to 741741 to start a text chat with the Crisis Text Line 24/7. 
  • If you think you have a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital. Do not attempt to access emergency care through this website. 

Mental health conditions, like severe depression, are more common than most people realize. And we can help you find support. Discuss your symptoms with your doctor or a mental health professional right away. Everyone’s experience is different, but there are different ways you can get help for severe depression, like psychiatry and therapy.

Note:

  • This assessment isn’t a diagnosis — but it can help guide you to appropriate care resources. For a diagnosis, contact your doctor or mental health professional.  
  • You can retake this self-assessment anytime. 

This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.


This self-assessment was developed by Drs. Robert L. Spitzer, Janet B.W. Williams, Kurt Kroenke, and colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. Reproduced here by Kaiser Permanente (no permissions required).

Reviewed by Han Liang, MD, March 2020.